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Better Choices

Another Reason to Support Organic – It Will More Effectively Feed the World During the Global Drought

When people get into a debate about whether organic food is worth it or not, the first issue that always comes up is price.

While organic can cost a little more, there are numerous ways to make it less expensive, such as buying in the bulk bins or purchasing directly from local organic farmers.

Yet, what is often missing in this discussion is how organic is so much better for the planet.

And this is something that absolutely must be part of the narrative as to why organic is the superior choice, particularly because the global food system is responsible for 44-57% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

From the Center for Food Safety’s excellent report Food & Climate: Connecting the Dots, Choosing the Way Forward, we know that organic agriculture uses 30-50% less fossil fuel energy than industrial farms.

And in a new study published in Nature Plantsresearchers have concluded that organic yields are consistently greater than conventional farming yields during periods of global drought.

This should be of immediate importance to everyone, and not just to those people living in California.

According to NASA, the water table is dropping all over the globe, and 21 of the world’s largest 37 aquifers have passed their sustainability tipping points, which means that water is being taken out faster than it is being replaced.

In the U.S., 50 billion gallons of water per day are being used for agricultural purposes, and approximately 40% of the world’s grain comes from irrigated land.

With our water reserves running low and not being replaced, groundwater depletion raises the likelihood of global food crises.

So, if we want to feed the 9 billion people expected to be on the planet by 2050, water must be a major consideration when selecting how we grow our food.

And that is exactly why the findings from the Nature Plants study are so critical.

Given that organic soil is built up and maintained with organic material, it is much more able to hold onto water. Therefore, by the time a farmer is ready to plant or harvest a crop, the plant has more access to water, which results in higher yields.

John Reganold, Professor of Soil Science and Agroecology at Washington State University and co-author of the new study, said that for every inch of rainwater soaked up by soil, a plant can produce another 7-8 bushels of wheat. That is very, very significant.

So, the next time someone is telling you that GMOs are the only way to feed the world, educate this person that with no water, there is no food.

And the best way to preserve our dwindling water supplies while also achieving increased yields during periods of drought is through organic farming.

A message from Foodstirs

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Order your kit today!

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Living Maxwell

Better Choices

Organic Broccoli Sprouts Provide Amazing Health Benefits…..and Sulforaphane

If you ever go to a talk by Dr. Brian Clement, founder of the Hippocrates Health Institute and the person in this video discussing the merits of Green Juice vs. Green Smoothies, you can be guaranteed to hear this: eat and juice sprouts.

The reason that he is saying this is because sprouts have incredibly important health properties.  They have very high levels of nutrients and enzymes, which provide the body valuable energy to detox and strengthen the immune system.

According to the Hippocrates Health Institute, the other key benefits of sprouts include:

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A message from Tradin Organic

How Tradin Organic is Helping Coconut Farmers in The Philippines

For more than a decade, Tradin Organic has been working with local partners in The Philippines to bring a diversified range of organic products to the market, such as coconut oil, tropical fruits and even cocoa.

The company is helping to support local farmers by assisting them with technical support and organic certification, in addition to paying Fairtrade premium on top of the organic premium.

Learn more.

Living Maxwell

Better Choices

Have We Been Misled? 5 Organic Foods That Should Make You Think Twice

I spend an inordinate amount of time learning about the healthiest and newest organic food products available. Through my research at the various trade shows — most notably, Natural Products Expo East and Natural Products Expo West —  talking to industry contacts, roaming supermarket aisles, speaking with as many well-informed food people as I can and reading books, I have come to the following conclusion:

You can take almost any food in the world and some health expert will have something good to say about it while a different health expert will have something bad to say about it.

So, what I do is educate myself as much as I can and then make my own decision about whether I should be eating it or not.

The following five organic foods seem to be the most controversial. While books could be written on all of the foods below and by no means am I covering all of the pros/cons of each, I will try to highlight the most salient points.

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Living Maxwell

Better Choices

RE Botanicals Becomes the First National, Certified Organic CBD Brand for US-Grown Hemp

As you may have already realized, CBD (short for cannabidiol — a cannabis compound) is exploding in popularity and is showing up in an increasing number of food, beverage and personal care products.

Despite the explosion of CBD oils and CBD-infused drinks, almost all of these products do not contain the USDA organic seal.

Boulder-based RE Botanicals has bucked this trend and has become the first national CBD brand to receive USDA organic certification for U.S.-grown hemp. Given who is behind RE Botanicals, the fact that it has achieved this milestone should not come as a surprise at all.

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livingmaxwell: a guide to organic food & drink