Organic Insider: David Bronner – CEO of Dr. Bronner’s and a Vegan – Gives His Take on the Impossible Burger Controversy

Organic Insider: David Bronner - CEO of Dr. Bronner's and a Vegan - Gives His Take on the Impossible Burger Co

David Bronner is the CEO of Dr. Bronner’s and one of the most influential and actively engaged leaders in the organic industry. When it comes to taking a stand on important social and environmental issues, I do not believe there is another company in our industry that has stepped up more than Dr. Bronner’s. The […]

Organic Insider
LivingMaxwell.com

David Bronner is the CEO of Dr. Bronner’s and one of the most influential and actively engaged leaders in the organic industry.

When it comes to taking a stand on important social and environmental issues, I do not believe there is another company in our industry that has stepped up more than Dr. Bronner’s. The company has given millions to GMO-labeling, regenerative organic agriculture, organic hemp farming, the Organic Farmers Association and many other important causes.

In this week’s Organic Insider, I spoke with David Bronner, and we discussed the whole Impossible Burger controversy. Not only is David a vegan, but earlier this year he was publicly in support of the Impossible Burger, which contains a genetically-engineered protein as its main ingredient.

In my interview, David talks about:

– Why he was in favor of the Impossible Burger but has since changed his stance on it

– What would have to happen for him to be in support of the Impossible Burger again

– If the meat industry was behind the FDA’s rejection of the safety claims of Impossible Foods (the Impossible Burger)

– The three criteria that synbio GMO proteins, such as the one in the Impossible Burger, must meet in order for him to be okay with them

– The big picture goal that all of us need to be focusing on

The interview with David addresses one of the most important issues that are our industry faces today – should the organic industry be okay with genetically-engineered food products if they can lead to fewer CAFOs (animal factory farms), less pesticide use, and a reduction in organic farms being contaminated by GMOs?

Or, should we be against all genetically-engineered food products, even if they can potentially produce positive results in other areas of society?

Without question, this is a complex matter, but it is one that we need to be discussing.

To read my full interview with David Bronner, just sign up for a FREE, 2-week trial of Organic Insider (no credit card required) and I will send it right over to you.

https://organicinsider.com

Wishing you a great day!
Max


2 Comments

  • Markus Delron says:

    thats the guy my money is going to? I think I will start buying black soap by dr woods or something else. no this is not. commercial. just a realization that my money is going to …. THAT guy??

    • David Kagan says:

      What do you expect? Did you see a bar from Dr. Bronner’s from a few years ago?

      The original Dr. Emanuel Bronner was much stranger. Like a philosophical Dr. Strangelove. If anything, the more recent David Bronner is much more conservative, much more “normal”, which is why he reigned in the labels.

      Who knows, maybe Dr. Woods is a fruit loop, too, haha. In truth, many entrepreneurs are.

      That’s why the old story goes that the appealing & popular kids in high school tend to become the milk men, while the geeks, dorks and nerds go on to shake up the world. With a few going on to owning it.

      It’s kind of something you have to deal with, should you wish to buy anything. Boring people almost never make new & innovative things. They run the numbers and get their dry cleaning done on time. Useful things to be sure, but it’s the more “off kilter” folks like Steve Jobs’ and Richard Branson’s that really change things and move the needles.

      So the people we buy from will rarely, if ever, have similar aesthetics. They’re almost always going to be off on their own thing. Different than whatever “thing” is “our thing”, even if we ourselves are in the creative or entrepreneuial class.

      What we can do, however, is make sure the people we buy from have similar ethics to our own. Preferably decent ones that take the interests of many people and the planet into account.

      Similar ethics are more than enough, really. This way, at least we can see the world get a little better each year, instead of the other way around.

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