Pressed Juice – A Video Explanation

Written by Max Goldberg on August 18, 2010. Follow Max on Twitter: @livingmaxwell.

5/29/13: PLEASE MAKE SURE THAT YOU CHECK OUT THE WORLD’S FIRST PRESSED ORGANIC JUICE DIRECTORY BY CLICKING HERE.

Pressed juice?  What is that exactly?

This was the question that I asked about four years ago when I was living in Miami and someone had uttered the words “pressed juice”.

As soon as I learned that pressed juice was the most nutritious juice available, I started drinking it immediately. Not only is it better for me, but the taste is superior. Pressed juice is thicker and more smooth than regular fresh-squeezed juice.

In this video, I explain exactly what is pressed juice, its benefits and how it differs from the juice we get from traditional centrifugal juicers.

The one problem with pressed juice is that it is not widely available across the country. While I am fortunate to be living in New York City, where pressed juice can be found in numerous different organic restaurants and juice bars, it is hard to find in other areas.

Even when I travel to California, where organic food is ubiquitous, finding pressed juice is nearly impossible.

Based on what I have seen in NYC, I know that the demand for this type of juice is enormous and that should spur health-conscious entrepreneurs to capitalize on this growing trend. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that pressed juice is only going to grow in popularity.

5 Comments

  1. that was an amazing video! well done.
    i’d like to add a few comments on the subject!

    first on rotary machines:
    a common myth in the juice industry is that a rotary blade juicer heats the produce and therefore kills nutirents and enzymes. not true. if we take a carrot that is room temp. and push it through a rotary juice machine’s feed chute, the carrot pulp remains room temp and the juice that is produced in seconds comes out immediately at room temp. there is no pasteurization at all.

    the problem with a rotary machine is that it is simply ineffecient at liberating a solid piece of produce of its nutrients and enzymes.

    the next issue arises due to the spinning blade. its like a super speed fan that generates air and the air wants to escape through the juice spout and the pulp chute, and consequenlty through the juice as well.

    cut produce with air forced into the juice molecules decomposes very fast. the juice is not dead in 5 minute or even 15. the juice is decomposing and that process takes some time. rotary blade juice is still great as long as the produce is oragnic and the juice is consumed within 20 to 30 min. the operative word is organic.

    dr. norman walker invented his press ( the norwalk) in 1930. he discovered an ingenious way to liberate the nutrients and enzymes by using a slow turning blade that first pulverized the produce into a moshy pulp.

    stage two of the norwalk press is to take the moshy pulp and press it on a 3 ton press that extracts the liquid. once the complete two stage process is complete, the remain pulp is virtually dry and devoid of nutirents. the juice is a superb tasting ultra rich and vibrant juice.

    the press is available to home users. it is expensive – labor intensive and requires total dedication to juicing. if you do buy one it will change your life if you drink 4 to 8 pints of organic cold pressed juice every day.

    because of the process employed by a norwalk, one may bottle the juice for 2 to 3 days and it remains fresh tasting and completely vital. ( juice must be refrigerated at low temps in an air tight bottle).

    juice places in nyc that use norwalks generally have incredible turn over so you dont have to worry about buying 3 day old juice.

    we are selling 120 % of our juice. we sell out daily and we are producing juice all day to keep up. juice is generally never more than a couple of hours old. its amazing.

    there are several places to buy cold press juice in nyc.
    not everyone uses a norman walker. the big guys use a large press called the x1. i dont like the taste of the juice it produces. my competitor agrees, and he actually owns one. however he uses 8 norwalks and lends his main competitor his x1. confussing.

    just make sure that your selection of juice is derived from organic produce. the enzymes and nutrients are less than top standard on non organic produce.

    norman walker lived 99 years . he preached religiously about the need to use organic only. he was one of the great pioneers of juicing and bar none a living legend and knowledge base for all of the raw food and raw organic juice industry. he did many scientific studies on the health benefits of cold pressed organic juice and raw salads. his books are simple and precise and are a resource for food knowledge.

    thanks for letting me speak and thanks for the favorable video.

    -marcus

    Written by marcus on August 19, 2010 @ 11:47 pm
  2. Thanks so much for this in-depth explanation, Marcus. It was very insightful and detailed.

    For those who don’t know, Marcus Antebi is the founder of The Juice Press, a great organic juice bar in Manhattan’s East Village and the place where I shot the video.

    Written by livingmaxwell on August 20, 2010 @ 9:57 am
  3. [...] night, I was at The Juice Press, one of my favorite pressed organic juice places here in NYC, and stumbled upon something very [...]

  4. Pressed juice! Thanks for bringing it up.

    I was shocked to see what passes for healthy juicing in CA and NY, but don’t expect it much better in other states.

    Here’s what passes for healthy juice….

    1. Don’t wash fruit
    2. Don’t remove apple core
    3. Don’t remove organic label from produce. Worker thinks machine removes labels. WRONG, customers are drinking the labels.

    I’ve got a Norwalk and I’m thankful for it. Glad I found your blog. It’s fabulous.

    Written by Jackie on March 18, 2011 @ 4:45 pm
  5. Hi Jackie,

    I have seen workers juice the labels before and it is not a pretty sight. Lucky you to have a Norwalk!!! How great!!

    Thanks for your kind words about my site.

    Live well,
    Max

    Written by Max Goldberg on March 18, 2011 @ 4:59 pm

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