Organic Black Sesame Seeds – Something You’ll Always See in My Kitchen

Written by Max Goldberg on January 17, 2012. Follow Max on Twitter: @livingmaxwell.

When it comes to eating, I like clean and light food.

My body seems to reject heavy sauces, fried foods, and sautées, even if they are 100% organic.

I like simplicity in a meal and as a result, I tend to cook a decent amount for myself. Why?

Not only is cooking at home the most inexpensive way to eat organic but I can have exactly what I want.

Whenever I make quinoa, millet or a big salad, one of my favorite things to put on these dishes are black sesame seeds.

A rarity at organic restaurants, black sesame seeds can always be found in my kitchen for a few different reasons.

First, they are very rich in minerals such as magnesium, calcium, copper, and zinc. Getting these minerals into my diet is extremely important.

Second, I love the slightly nutty taste of black sesame seeds and they add tremendously to the flavor profile of whatever I am eating.

According to Chinese medicine, black sesame seeds are very good for the kidney and liver.

Some people also claim that black sesame seeds can reverse gray hair.

Whether black sesame seeds can actually reverse gray hair or not, I can’t say for sure. But I do have plenty of gray hair and I do eat a lot of organic black sesame seeds, so I’ll keep you posted on this one.

Organic black sesame seeds can be purchased online by clicking HERE.

 

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9 Comments

  1. Any updates on if your grey hair improved using black sesame seeds ?

    Written by Sam on January 27, 2013 @ 2:09 am
  2. Hi Sam,

    I do believe that the amount of grey hair has not increased. It’s possible that it has but it is not noticeable to me.

    Hope this helps!

    Live well,
    Max

    Written by Max Goldberg on January 27, 2013 @ 9:35 pm
  3. Hi Max,

    I keep sesame seeds in my pantry as well although I have unhulled white sesame seeds. I’ve not seen unhulled black sesame seeds. The unhulled seeds have a higher mineral content than hulled. I’m still looking for information on absorption rates of these minerals for hulled vs unhulled when used/consumed raw. Might you know?

    Also, I believe all black foods are good for the kidney and liver–black beans, blackberries, blueberries, etc.

    Kate

    Written by Kate on February 3, 2013 @ 12:54 pm
  4. Hi Kate,

    Soaking the seeds will cause them to sprout and make them more bio-available, and they’ll still be raw. Hope this helps!

    Live well,
    Max

    Written by Max Goldberg on February 3, 2013 @ 2:10 pm
  5. Thanks, Max. I’ll try soaking and sprouting them.

    Written by Kate on February 9, 2013 @ 9:44 pm
  6. Sounds great Kate!

    Live well,
    Max

    Written by Max Goldberg on February 10, 2013 @ 10:09 am
  7. I’ve always loved black sesame seeds. When I finally found the raw version by International Harvest’s (16 oz.), I started eating them every day. So far no gray hair, and, hopefully, will stay this way.

    Sylvie

    Written by Sylvie on June 29, 2013 @ 3:27 pm
  8. Lucky you, Sylvie! I have plenty of gray hair!!

    So great to see another black sesame seed fan!

    Live well,
    Max

    Written by Max Goldberg on July 1, 2013 @ 3:24 pm
  9. Anyone know any other places online that sell these seeds? The link in the article leads to a product that is not in supply. Are they that popular?

    Written by Josh Seiler on October 7, 2013 @ 9:05 pm

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